How Does WordPress Work?

In this post, we’ll explain how WordPress works from the ground up. We’ll start by explaining the basics of how a website is built and then move on to different sections of a WordPress site.

With tens of thousands of themes and plugins available, it’s easy to get lost in all the choices out there. Where should you start? Where can you find quality themes and plugins? Where do you begin customizing your website to make it your own?

The first thing to remember is that WordPress is a framework. You aren’t limited to doing everything within a particular framework.

WordPress, as a content management system (CMS), takes care of a lot of the heavy lifting for you. It allows you to build your site without knowing how HTML, CSS, or PHP work underneath the hood.

So, How does WordPress work?

Here’s a quick rundown of what happens under the hood:

WordPress implements database-backed content management that uses PHP to store and retrieve data. WordPress doesn’t include any database or server-side code.

The whole site is stored in the database in a way that’s similar to an HTML file. If you think of hosting providers as your store, then your store is stored in the database.

WordPress implements database-backed content management that uses PHP to store and retrieve data. WordPress doesn’t include any database or server-side code.

The whole site is stored in the database in a way that’s similar to an HTML file. If you think of hosting providers as your store, then your store is stored in the database.

WordPress allows you to control the appearance of your website by adding themes to it. You can choose from thousands of premade themes or create your own theme from scratch with CSS, HTML, and JavaScript.

WordPress allows you to control the appearance of your website by adding themes to it. You can choose from thousands of premade themes or create your own theme from scratch with CSS, HTML, and JavaScript.

Themes allow you to control how each section of your site looks and works using PHP templates. For example, let’s say that you have a blog on your website.

You can create a template that displays the latest post in HTML format. You can also change the design of the template to match your business’s branding.

Themes allow you to control how each section of your site looks and works using PHP templates. For example, let’s say that you have a blog on your website.

You can create a template that displays the latest post in HTML format. You can also change the design of the template to match your business’s branding.

Plugins provide additional functionality for WordPress sites by extending its functionality. You can install plugins from the WordPress repository or find plugins from outside sources. Some common uses for plugins include adding a contact form, creating social logins, and adding email subscriptions to your site.

Plugins provide additional functionality for WordPress sites by extending its functionality. You can install plugins from the WordPress repository or find plugins from outside sources.

Some common uses for plugins include adding a contact form, creating social logins, and adding email subscriptions to your site. To get content on your website, WordPress allows you to add posts and pages. You can create both posts and pages that are stored in the database.

To get content on your website, WordPress allows you to add posts and pages. You can create both posts and pages that are stored in the database.

You can store everything you need for your website in the WordPress database by creating custom post types, taxonomies, and meta data. These allow you to store user-generated content on your site along with some custom information about that content.

Conclusion

Hopefully, this post has given you a good overview of how WordPress works. It’s a great framework that makes it easy to build websites for your business or organization.

If you would like to learn more, check out our free WordPress tutorials on the Clubhouse blog. We cover topics ranging from how to build a basic website with WordPress to troubleshooting your site’s issues.

Related Post